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Abraham Lincoln: A History Civil War Plans of Campaign Nicolay Hay

$25.99

Abraham Lincoln: A History Civil War Plans of Campaign Nicolay Hay

$25.99
SKU:
00018
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Product Description

This historic 126+ year old ORIGINAL vintage article was carefully removed from the Century Magazine, published in 1888.  Written by John G. Nicolay and John Hay, private secretaries to the president, the article is 23 pages long.  The page size is 6 ¼ x 9 ¼ .  (00018)

Condition:  Good Condition with some light toning to the pages due to age.

Excerpt from the Article:

“Aware that his army was less than one-third as strong as the Union forces, Johnston contented himself with neutralizing the army at Washington, passing the time in drilling and disciplining his troops, which, according to his own account, were seriously in need of it. He could not account for the inactivity of the Union army. Military operations, he says, were practicable until the end of December; but he was never molested. Our military exercises had never been interrupted. No demonstrations were made by the troops of that army, except the occasional driving in of a Confederate cavalry picket by a large mixed force. The Federal cavalry rarely ventured beyond the protection of infantry, and the ground between the two armies had been less free to it than to that of the Confederate army. There was at no time any serious thought
of attacking the Union forces in front of Washington. In the latter part of September, General Johnston had thought it possible for the Richmond government to give him such additional troops as to enable him to take the offensive, and Jefferson Davis had come to headquarters at Fairfax Court House to confer with the principals on that subject. At this conference, held on the 1st of October, it was taken for granted that no attack could be made, with any chances of success, upon the Union army in its position before Washington ; but it was thought that, if enough force could be concentrated for the purpose, the Potomac might be crossed at the nearer ford, Maryland brought into rebellion, and a battle delivered in rear of Washington, where McClellan would fight at a disadvantage. Mr. Davis asked the three generals present, Johnston, Beauregard, and G. W. Smith, beginning with the last, how many troops would be required for such a
movement. Smith answered" fifty thousand "; Johnston and I3eauregard both said "sixty thousand "; and all agreed that they would require a large increase of ammunition and means of transportation. Mr. Davis said it was impossible to reinforce them to that extent, and the plan was dropped.”

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