Categories

Categories

Account Navigation

Account Navigation

Currency - All prices are in AUD

Currency - All prices are in AUD
 Loading... Please wait...
Pages from the Past

Categories

Categories

1926 Vladivostok Seaport Krasnoyarsk Early Views Siberia Sepia Print

$36.99

1926 Vladivostok Seaport Krasnoyarsk Early Views Siberia Sepia Print

$36.99
SKU:
PP0035
Shipping:
Calculated at checkout
Quantity:
Share

Product Description

1926 Vladivostok Seaport Krasnoyarsk Early Views Siberia Rotogravure Sepia Print

We are pleased to offer a historic 90+ year old ORIGINAL Rotogravure print titled Important City and Leading Seaport of Siberia.    This beautiful vintage Sepia print is 10.5" x 16" (PP0035) 

Captions state:

"Birdseye view of Vladivostok, the chief seaport of Siberia.  It has a capacious harbor, in which the largest ships have ample sea room, and before the war carried on an extensive foreign trade.  City of Krasnoyarsk, an important trade centre and the fourth largest town in Siberia.  The bleak and sombre aspect of the Siberian landscapte, accentuated by the dark trees and frowning mountains, is characteristic of the country."

Condition:

Good Condition with some very light toning to the page due to age.  There are a few small closed tears present along the border.  See photos.  Please note that there is printing on the reverse side of the page.

Rotogravure?Gravure Printing

Gravure printing originated in the early nineteenth century. The process did not become widespread until the early twentieth century, however, when newspapers embraced this new technology. Characterized by quality halftone reproductions printed at high speed on a variety of paper stock, gravure printing allowed the newspaper industry to reproduce photographs and art work on a mass scale on inexpensive newsprint paper.   

The technology adopted by newspapers is more precisely called rotogravure?gravure printing from an etched cylinder as opposed to a flat plate. Unlike the letterpress, which uses raised or relief printing, gravure uses intaglio printing, in which metal is etched with recessed "cells" to hold the ink. The process was first used in art reproduction because of its high quality tonal gradation and color depth. From this process evolved photogravure?gravure printing where a plate is etched from a photographic image. Fox Talbot of Great Britain produced the first photographic negatives in 1852. Karl Klic (Klitsch or Klietsch) modified Talbot's process in 1879 by using copper cylinders (instead of plates) for rotary printing and rotogravure was born.

Product Reviews