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1888 Siberia Political Exiles George Kennan Society of Friends of Russian Freedom

$27.99

1888 Siberia Political Exiles George Kennan Society of Friends of Russian Freedom

$27.99
SKU:
00015
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Product Description

This historic 127+ year old ORIGINAL vintage article, My Meeting with the Political Exiles, was carefully removed from the Century Magazine, published in 1888.    This extensive article, written by George Kennan, contains 21 pages with 17 illustrations.  Page size is 6 ¼ x 9 ¼.  (00015)  2/15


Vintage illustrations include:

  • Map of the route traveled in the article
  • Map of Siberia, with shaded portion showing route traveled
  • First view of the Altai Mountains
  • The Altai Station
  • Our house
  • Picnic ground, Valley of the Bukhtarma
  • Cossack Picket of Jingistal
  • Village of Arul
  • Ascent of Mountain-Trail from Berel
  • Kirghis Encampment of the Summit
  • Distant View of the Katunski Alps
  • The Rakhmanofski Hot Springs
  • The Descent into the valley of the White Berel
  • Part of Great Glacier from Central Moraine
  • Katunski Waterfall
  • Gorge of the Katun from the foot of the Glacier


Condition:  Good Condition with some light toning to the pages due to age.

Excerpt from the article:

“Our first meeting with political exiles in Siberia was brought about by a fortunate accident, and, strangely enough, through the instrumentality of the Government. Among the many officers whose acquaintance we made in Semipalatinsk was an educated and intelligent gentleman named Pavlovski,* who had long held an important position in the Russian service, and who was introduced to us as a man whose wide and accurate knowledge of Siberia, especially of the steppe provinces, might render him valuable to us, both as an adviser and as a source of trustworthy information. Although Mr. Pavlovski impressed me from the first as a cultivated, humane, and liberal man, I naturally hesitated to apply to him for information concerning the political exiles. The advice given me in St. Petersburg had led me to believe that the Government would regard with disapprobation any attempt on the part of a foreign traveler to investigate a certain class of political questions or to form the acquaintance of a certain class of political offenders ; and I expected, therefore, to have to make all such investigations and acquaintances stealthily and by underground methods. I was not at that time aware of the fact that Russian officials and political exiles are often secretly in sympathy, and it would never have occurred to me to seek the aid of the one class in making the acquaintance of the other. In all of my early conversations with Mr. Pavlovski, therefore, I studiously avoided the subject of political exile, and gave him, I think, no reason whatever to suppose that I knew anything about the Russian revolutionary movement, or felt any particular interest in the exiled revolutionists.”

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