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1888 Civil War Fort Donelson Lincoln Nicolay Tennessee Kentucy Vintage Article

$27.99

1888 Civil War Fort Donelson Lincoln Nicolay Tennessee Kentucy Vintage Article

$27.99
SKU:
00020
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Product Description

This historic 127+ year old ORIGINAL vintage article, Abraham Lincoln:  A History Tennessee and Kentucky, was carefully removed from the Century Magazine, published in 1888.  Written by John G. Nicolay and John Hay, private secretaries to the president, the article is 21 pages.  Included is a map of Tennessee and Kentucky.  The page size is 6 ¼ x 9 ¼ .  (00020)

Article Sections:

    Halleck
    The Tennessee Line
    Lincoln Directs Cooperation
    Grant and Thomas in Kentucky
    Fort Donelson


Condition:  Good Condition with some light toning to the pages due to age.


Excerpt from the Article:  

“In sending General Hunter to relieve Fremont, the President did not intend that he should remain in charge of the Department of the West. Out of its vast extent the Department of Kansas was created a few days afterward, embracing the State of Kansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territories of Nebraska, Colorado, and Dakota, with headquarters
at Fort Leavenworth, and Hunter was transferred to its command. General Halleck was assigned to the Department of the Missouri, embracing the States of Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Arkansas, and that portion of Kentucky west of the Cumberland River.


 Henry Wager Halleck was born in Oneida County, New York, January 15, 1815. Educated at Union College, he entered the military academy at West Point, where he graduated third in a class of thirty-one, and was made second lieutenant of engineers July 1, 1839. While yet a cadet he was employed at the academy as assistant professor of engineering. From the first he devoted himself with constant industry to the more serious studies of his profession. He had attained a first lieutenancy when the Mexican war broke out, and was sent to the Pacific coast. Valuable services in the military and naval operations prosecuted there secured him the brevet of captain from May 1, 1847. On the conquest of California by the United States forces, he took part in the political organization of the new State, first as Secretary of State under the military governors, and afterward as leading member of the convention which framed the constitution under which California was admitted to the Union.

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