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1887 Abraham Lincoln Douglas Debates Kansas History Lecompton Constitution Nicolay Hay

$27.99

1887 Abraham Lincoln Douglas Debates Kansas History Lecompton Constitution Nicolay Hay

$27.99
SKU:
00466
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Product Description

1887 Abraham Lincoln Douglas Debates Kansas History Lecompton Constitution Nicolay Hay Vintage Article


This historic 125+ year old ORIGINAL vintage article, The Lincoln-Douglas Debates-Abraham Lincoln: A History, was carefully removed from the Century Magazine, published in 1887.  Written by John G. Nicolay and John Hay, private secretaries to the president, this is a section of a six-part history on the Life of Lincoln, published in the Century Magazine.   This extensive article is 28 pages, with 7 engravings / illustrations.  Nicolay and Hay The page size is 6 ¼ x 9 ¼ . (00466)

Illustrations / Engravings include:

  • Building in which the Lecompton Constitution was drawn
  • James Buchanan, President, 1857-61
  • Governor Robert J. Walker
  • Frederick P. Stanton
  • John Calhoun
  • Stephen A. Douglas
  • Life-mask of Stephen A. Douglas
     

Sections of Text:

  • The Lecompton Constitution
  • The Revolt of Douglas
  • The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
  • The Freeport Doctrine


Condition:

  Good Condition with some variance in page color due to age.


Excerpt from the article:

But the one dominating characteristic of Lincoln's speeches is their contant recurrence to broad and enduring principles, their unremitting effort to lead public opinion to loftier and nobler conceptions of political duty; and nothing in his career stamps him so distinctively American-"the first American," as Lowell has so happily named him-as his constant eulogy and defense of the philosopical precepts of the Declaration of Independance.

"At Galeburg the other day, I said, in answer to Judge Douglas, that three years ago there never had been a man, so far as I knew or believed, in the whole world, who had said that the Declaration of Independence did not include negroes in the term all men.  I reassert it today.  I assert that Judge Douglas and all his friends may search the whole records of the country, and it will be a matter of great astonishment to me if they shall be able to find that one human being three years ago had ever uttered the astounding sentiment that the term 'all men' in the Declaration did not include the negro"

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